About
Founded in 1894 and headquartered in Colorado Springs, Colorado, the United States Olympic Committee is the National Olympic Committee for the United States. In addition, the USOC is one of only four NOCs in the world that also serve as the National Paralympic Committee for their country. The USOC is responsible for supporting, entering and overseeing U.S. teams for the Olympic, Paralympic, Youth Olympic, Pan American and Parapan American Games and serves as the steward of the Olympic and Paralympic movements in the U.S. Unlike most other nations, the United States does not have a sports ministry.

The USOC was reorganized by the Ted Stevens Olympic and Amateur Sports Act, originally enacted in 1978. It is a federally chartered nonprofit corporation and does not receive federal financial support (other than for select Paralympic military programs). Pursuant to the Act, the USOC has the exclusive right to use and authorize the use of Olympic-related marks, images and terminology in the United States. The USOC licenses that right to sponsors as a means of generating revenue in support of its mission.

The USOC is governed by a 16-member board of directors and a professional staff headed by a CEO. The USOC also has three constituent councils to serve as sources of opinion and advice to the board and USOC staff, including the Athletes’ Advisory Council, National Governing Bodies Council and Multi-Sport Organizations Council. The AAC and the NGBC each have three representatives on the board, while six members of the board are independent. The CEO of the organization and all American members of the IOC (three as of December 2012) are ex officio members of the board.

Mission
To support U.S. Olympic and Paralympic athletes in achieving sustained competitive excellence while demonstrating the values of the Olympic Movement, thereby inspiring all Americans.​